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  • Jan 21, 2016 BERNE Joins #DonateDenim Campaign BERNE Apparel joined the #DonateDenim campaign by donating 1,000 pairs of jeans to those in need.
  • Sep 1, 2015 Introducing the Adder System Introducing BERNE Concealed Carry Workwear (CCW) featuring the Adder System. This all new line of workwear features the patent pending Adder System pocket that gives users fast access to concealed weapons through a quick opening pocket. 

Buying Guide

Buying Guide

Cotton Duck 

Cotton Duck canvas is by far the most popular workwear fabric in the world. The term "duck" comes from the Dutch word doek, which means "lined canvas". Duck fabrics were originally used for sailors clothing and sails. The fabric is a very tightly woven fabric and typically has two yarns in the warp and one in the weft. Because of its smooth finish and tight weave, the fabric is incredibly resistant to snagging and extremely wind resistant. Most work clothing manufacturers offer a variety of weights and finishes in their product lines. Finishes typically are either washed or rigid. Though manufacturers may use different terms, most finishes fall into one of these two broad categories.

Rigid Duck Fabrics

Sometimes referred to as "firm hand", rigid duck fabrics are typically stiffer and less flexible. This is the most traditional finish for work outerwear. Some manufacturers treat their rigid duck fabrics with a durable water repellent finish to provide the wearer with some additional protection from the elements.

 

 



Washed Duck Fabrics

This finish has the most variations in terms used by manufacturers. Many work clothing manufacturers refer to this as "sanded", which technically describes an additional process performed on the woven fabrics prior to cutting and sewing in which the nap of the fabric is lightly peached by being brushed or lightly sanded. The effects of this process provide a softer "hand" (or feel) to the fabric. Washed Duck garments are cut and sewn together then washed in large industrial washing machines in either a water-based solution or an enzyme-based solution depending upon the desired end result. Enzyme solutions typically produce a more "pre-worn" look by distressing seams slightly while water solution washes mainly produce a softer feel without altering the color much.


Fabric Weights 

The clothing industry typically refers to the weight of a fabric in terms of ounces. All Berne fabrics and insulations are measured by weighing a 36"x36" piece of fabric or insulation. When it comes to shell fabrics, Berne offers the following two weights.

10 ounce 100% cotton duck

You'll typically see this shell fabric described as "heavy-duty" cotton duck on product descriptions. Because rigid fabrics are, by nature, more stiff than washed products, Berne uses this weight in most of their mens' rigid duck outerwear styles. This weight of rigid duck fabric is more flexible than it's 12 ounce counterpart. Keep in mind, the difference between the 10 ounce and 12 ounce fabric weights is only 2 ounces on a large, 36"x36" piece of fabric.

All of Berne's ladies and youth products feature this weight of fabric to provide the best balance of comfort and durability.

This heavy-duty fabric provides solid wind and abrasion resistance and good durability.

12 ounce 100% cotton duck

This fabric weight is offered primarily in Berne's men's washed outerwear styles. It is a rugged, heavy cotton canvas that provides maximum wind and abrasion resistance and exceptional durability.

Shrinkage & Laundering 

Berne 100% cotton duck fabrics have a shrink rate of approximately 3%. Duck fabric is machine washable and will hold its shape throughout the life of the garment. Please follow all manufacturers washing instructions found on the sewn in label of every Berne garment.

Insulation & Lining Types 

Berne products are offered in a wide variety of combinations of insulations and linings. For the purpose of this buying guide, we'll break down the various lining and insulation types individually. You'll see them combined in product descriptions like "heavyweight polyfil quilted to 100% polyester brushed tricot".

Polyfil Insulation

Polyfil insulation is a polyester fiber fill insulation used to reduce transfer of heat between objects. In the case of work clothing, it helps keep the cold, winter air out and the air warmed by your body heat in. In many Berne jackets, you will see heavyweight polyfil insulation used in the body of the garment and medium weight polyfil insulation used in the sleeves. This helps maximize warmth over your body without creating additional bulk around your arms.

Polyfil is typically quilted to some other material by stitching the two materials together, most commonly, in a diamond shaped pattern. By stitching the two layers together, this prevents the polyfil insulation from shifting or settling.

Brushed Tricot Lining


This type of lining is almost always quilted to polyfil. It is easily identified by it's soft, warm texture. Because of the texture of the lining, it is typically used only in the body of products and not in legs and sleeves.

Advantages:

  • Has a soft feel
  • Does not feel cool to the touch when put on
  • When quilted to polyfil insulation, provides excellent warmth

Disadvantages:

  • Other fabrics, dirt, straw, hair, etc. tend to "stick" to the lining

Taffeta Lining


This type of lining is almost always quilted to polyfil. It is easily identified by it's shiny, smooth finish.

Advantages:

  • The smooth, shiny surface makes it difficult for dirt, hair, straw, etc. to stick to the lining
  • Can be wiped off more easily than brushed tricot lining
  • When quilted to polyfil insulation, provides excellent warmth

Disadvantages:

  • The lining tends to have a cooler touch when first putting the product on if left in cold temperatures prior to wearing.

 

Sherpa Lining


Berne uses a 100% polyester sherpa in the lining of many styles of jackets for men, women and youth. The lining is easliy recognized by its resemblance to wool. It is an incredibly warm lining and has a very rich appearance to it. This lining is quickly becoming one of the most popular choices in Berne products.

Advantages:

  • Provides excellent warmth
  • Has a soft "wool" like feel (and ladies and girls styles feature an ultra-soft Sherpa lining)

Disadvantages:

  • Fabrics, dirt and straw tend to stick to this lining more than taffeta linings, but less than brushed tricot linings.

Fleece Lining


This lining is not typically quilted to polyfil insulation because of the weight of the lining by itself. However, for maximum warmth, some Berne products feature this lining quilted to polyfil insulation. The lining can be recognized by it's soft look and feel. It typically is considered to provide slightly less warmth than quilted linings and is, therefore, an excellent choice in more moderate climates and working conditions.

Advantages:

  • Provides good warmth without becoming too thick or bulky
  • Does not pill
  • Excellent for moderate climates and working conditions
  • Can by layered well with other Berne products for additional warmth

Disadvantages:

  • Not as warm as quilted linings

Flannel Lining


Flannel lining is a soft fabric lining which provides good warmth without much additional bulk. Berne uses flannel lining in several styles of jeans for men, women and youth.

Advantages:

  • Provides good warmth without becoming too thick or bulky
  • Excellent lining for clothing such as jeans
  • Can by layered well with other Berne products for additional warmth

Disadvantages:

  • Not as warm as quilted linings